About Us

The History of HHSYC

The HIP-HOP SUMMIT YOUTH COUNCIL, INC. ("HHSYC") was founded in 2001 by its Chairman, music industry veteran, community activist and author Charles Fisher.

It is a non-profit, 501 (c) 3 tax exempt organization located in New York, New York. The HHSYC has positioned itself as an effective voice for youth on a host of issues that confront them daily. Our goal is to "change the game" by improving the image and unity within the multi-billion dollar Hip-Hop industry and use its positive influence for the empowerment of youths and young adults. Since its inception the Council has sponsored a variety of activities that support our mission:

In August of 2001 we set the trends for Hip-Hop Summits by sponsoring the first official Hip-Hop Youth Summit at York College in Queens, New York. The event was attended by over 400 youths and provided them with a better understanding of a new movement called “Raptivism”, that would show them how to constructively use the Hip-Hop culture to improve their lives. The keynote speaker at the event was New York State Senate Minority Leader Malcolm Smith (D-Queens).

In January of 2002 the HHSYC and the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network sponsored the “Dream of King” Youth Summit in recognition and honor of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. The successful event highlighted the work of Dr. King and the civil rights movement. In attendance were NAS, Russell Simmons, Dr. Ben Chavis, Rev. Run, Ed Lover, Congressman Meeks (D-Queens), New York State Senate Minority Leader Malcolm Smith, & NY City Councilmembers Leroy Comrie and Eric Gioia. During the same month the HHSYC partnered with the Fresh Air Fund, which is the largest Camping organization in the Country, to expand their services to inner-city youth. As the executive director of the Camp Cool J Foundation founded by LL Cool J in 1992, Charles saw the importance of providing a free camping experience for inner-city youth to relieve them of the daily stress and chaos of urban life. Over the last several years the HHSYC has sent hundreds of kids to Camp Celebrity, Camp Mariah, Camp Tommy Hilfiger, Camp Anita Bliss Coler, Camp Hidden Valley, Camp Hayden-Marks Memorial and “Friendly Town” free of charge to enjoy a camping experience with a lifetime of memories.

In June of 2002 the organization played a major role in organizing youth for the historical “Educational Budget Cut Rally” at City Hall in New York. The June 4, 2002 event, which got the Mayor to restore all the educational money back into the city’s budget, was sponsored by the United Federation of Teachers, the Alliance for Quality Education, and his Hip-Hop Summit Action Network. The vent attracted many celebrities, elected officials and over 100,000 participants.

In November of 2002 the organization launched the "Hip-Hop 4 Peace" Project and a Task Force for “Gun, Prison and Drug Law reform” in honor of slain Hip-Hop legend Jam Master Jay. The HHSYC and the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network sponsored a special tribute to Jam Master Jay to commemorate the one-year anniversary of his passing on October 30, 2003. The event, which was held at the Queens Library was a huge success and helped garner additional support for the “Hip-Hop 4 Peace” Project. At the request of the HHSYC a special wing of the library’s new building was dedicated to Jay in his honor.

In November of 2002 Project Rebound was launched with the NBA's Washington Wizards and the Council of the Great City Schools (www.CGCS.org). Participants that achieve good grades and provide community service are invited to attend NBA games to meet the players and receive other incentives for academic and community achievements.

In January of 2003 we coordinated and/or moderated a series of well-attended Hip-Hop forums for the Rev. Jesse Jackson's 5th annual Wall Street Conference and Rev. Al Sharpton's 2nd annual National Action Network Convention in April of 2003; both in New York City. In June of 2003 the “Countdown to Fairness” Rally was held at City Hall in New York and was sponsored by the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network and the Coalition for Fairness—in which the HHSYC is a member. The rally was held to protest the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws. It also attracted many celebrities and elected officials drawing an estimated crowd of over 50,000 participants. The job of the HHSYC was to organize youth and young adults for the event, while educating them about the Rockefeller Drug Laws. The rally set the stage for the first reforms ever in the 31-year history of the tough Rockefeller Drug laws in August and December of 2005. In October of 2003 we partnered with York College of the City University of N.Y. to launch an Entertainment Business Program co-sponsored by Russell Simmons and Universal Music Group. The program offers a host of courses including: How to Start a Record Label; Audio & Video Technology; Introduction to the Music Business; and Music Marketing/Public Relations. The courses are available to students 14-21 years of age. In addition, participants enrolled in our program looking to obtain their G.E.D. can do so through York College. Those participants are then encouraged to attend the college once they receive their G.E.D. In January of 2004 the Youth Council’s Hip-Hop & Politics project partnered with the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network’s “Team Vote” project and with nationally syndicated Radio personality Doug Banks and his “One Mind. One Vote” campaign. Through this association we planned to register 10 million new voters by the 2008 election.

In July of 2004 the HHSYC also helped coordinate the first Latin Hip-Hop Summit at Lehman College. The event was hosted by the Bronx Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network. This historical event was a huge success and opened the door for the creation of the Hip-Hop Summit Youth Council’s Latin Division in 2007. Jose Nino, who is the former Chairman of the United States Hispanic Chamber of commerce, is the Advisory Board Chairman for the HHSYC’s new Latin division. In March of 2005 the HHSYC launched the A-TEAM (Artists, Actors, Athletes, and Authors against AIDS) with film star Rosario Dawson at York College in New York to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS.

In June of 2005 the Hip-Hop Summit released the King of Kings anti-drug documentary and soundtrack (www.KingofKingsDVD.com). This edgy docu-drama tells the story of a notorious drug family and the cartel they operated for over 23 years. The project talks about the role the family played in the “War on Drugs” and the launching of the TNT taskforce Nationwide by the government after the shooting of a Rookie New York City Police officer. The film and soundtrack educates youths about the importance of education and the dangers of Drugs, Guns and Gang Violence. The drug kingpins, who just returned from prison and are the centerpiece of the project, are now speaking to youths about the consequences of selling and using drugs.

In October of 2005 the HHSYC was selected as the Model Program for the Country by the Organizing Committee of the Millions More Movement. The event was a huge success and was attended by over one million participants. As one of the speakers Charles was able to unveil the program to those in attendance and millions of others via C-SPAN. Randy garnered support for HHSYC from Jadakiss of the L.O.X., Wyclef Jean, Rev .Al Sharpton and Rev. Jesse Jackson.

In April of 2006 the HHSYC partnered with several United Nations Agencies and their affiliates, including the World Sports Alliance, to launch the “Hip-Hop 4 Peace” project worldwide through the Hip-Hop 4 Peace Benefit Album and Documentary. In addition they have also launched the Rebuilding Africa Project (R.A.P), which was created to improve the quality of life for young people in Africa’s 54 countries. Both the CD and DVD will raise funds to support the United Nations Millennium Development Goals; the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence for the Children of the World; the USO and several humanitarian causes around the world conducted by UN agencies and their affiliate groups.

In June of 2006 the HHSYC partnered with the Warner Music Group and Bad Boy records to help launch a National School tour for Yung Joc, Cassie and Diddy. The purpose of the tour was to use Bad Boy artists to enlighten students on the importance of education, graduation and the vices that destroy young lives.

In July of 2006 the HHSYC launched the “Stars 4 the Yards” campaign with Nets owner Bruce Ratner, Jason Kidd, Vince Carter, Blue Magic, the Persuaders, Roberta Flack, former NBA players Darryl Dawkins & Albert King, Bertha Lewis of Acorn, Rev. Herbert Daughtry and many others in support of the building of the Nets stadium in Brooklyn, affordable housing, community programs for youth and employment for minorities.

In January of 2007 our Latin Division sponsored its first Three Kings Day Celebration for over 300 youths providing them with food, games, toys and entertainment. The very successful event was attended by the Bronx Boro President Adolfo Carrion, Councilman Miguel Martinez, Senator Eric Schneiderman, Dr. Ben Chavis, rapper Cuban Links and others.

In February of 2007 the HHSYC launched the “Display of Power” literacy initiative with FUBU founder and CEO Daymond John, who just released his Autobiography “Display of Power.” The purpose of the project, which has partnered with several bookstores and libraries, is to use Authors and celebrities to promote the importance of Literacy and Academic Success.

In June of 2007 the HHSYC launched the Hip-Hop Touchdown 4 Success project at the Law Enforcement High School for Public Safety with Green Bay Packer Fullback Brandon Miree. The purpose of the project is to use Sports and Music to help students achieve their academic and personal goals. In the same month we launched the Hip-Hop 4 Peace National tour during the 2007 Black Expo at the Jacob Javits Center in New York. The tour will now visit other cities bringing a positive message that will help our youth and young adults hurdle the many obstacle they are confronted with daily by addressing Poverty, a failing education system, and the Prison Industrial complex.

In August of 2007 the HHSYC co-sponsored the 4th Annual Youth Assembly at the United Nations with the Friendship Ambassadors Foundation and Dr. Elaine Valdov, Secretary General of the United Nations Youth Assembly. The event provided Leadership Training for over 700 youths from 87 countries. HHSYC also officially launched their Hip-Hop 4 the Millennium Development Goals Project, which will work with several UN agencies to address a host of issues that affect the quality of life for our youths and young adults worldwide.

In October of 2007 the HHSYC partnered with the United Nations Millennium Campaign to use the clout of the Hip-Hop Community to increase awareness worldwide about the “Stand Up & Speak Out” Against Poverty initiative, as well as the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDG's). Through this project citizens were enlightened on how they can get their government to reduce poverty and honor their commitment to address the MDG's by the year 2015. In 2000 the MDG's were signed by leaders from 189 countries with the intent to halve extreme poverty by 2015. Thanks in part to the Hip-Hop community we were able to break the 2006 Guinness World Record of 23.5 million by registering 43.7 million in 2007. Over the next seven years we will be working with several United Nations agencies, celebrities, elected officials, world and business leaders to address the eight MDG's which are to: Eradicate Poverty and Hunger; Achieve Universal Primary Education; Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women; Reduce Child Mortality; Improve Maternal Health; Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and other diseases; Ensure Environment Sustainability; and Develop a Global Partnership for Development.

January 2008 – After last year’s launch of the Hip-Hop Summit Youth Council’s (HHSYC) LATIN DIVISION the organization followed up its initial success by hosting its 2nd annual Three Kings Day celebration in recognition of this important day in the Latin Community. The event, which was a huge success thanks to our Latin Division Director Michele Garcia, was held at the De Ja Vu Lounge in the Bronx. Over 500 youths were in attendance to enjoy performances and free gifts donated by sponsors such as FUBU, USADrugPlan.com, KJR Sales, Mah’s Muzik, Dominoes Pizza, the NYPD Benevolence Association, NYC Commissioner Linares & the offices of the Bronx BP Carrion, Councilman Martinez and Senator Schneiderman. The Latino Division is committed to teaching participants how to constructively use their time, talent and the Hip-Hop Culture to improve social, political and economic conditions in their school, home and community. The keynote speaker representing the Mayor of the City of New York was Commissioner Linares. February 2008 – In an effort to educate our youths and young adults how to constructively use Hip-Hop as a vehicle for Social, Political and Economic Empowerment the Hip-Hop Summit Youth Council, Inc. and the NYS Association of Black and Puerto Rican Legislators, Inc. (NYSABPRL) launched “Youth Empowerment Day” at the 37th Annual Legislative Conference Weekend. The “Hip-Hop, Politics and Economics” Youth Summit was attended by notables such as Hip-Hop Icon Slick Rick, Senate Democratic Minority Leader Malcolm A. Smith, Assemblyman Carl E. Heastie, Senator Antoine M. Thompson, Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries, Senator Shirley Huntley, Assemblyman William Scarborough, Dr. Divine Pryor, Tameka Malloy, Tyrone McCray, Donovan Richards, DJ Baby Bear and over 400 youths. How to get ‘To the Top with Hip-Hop’ was the theme of the Youth Summit. The issue that was heavily debated was the 2.8 billion dollars of New York States Pension Fund money invested in 16 entertainment companies, with some of them supporting “Gangster Rap” and music that degrades our women. To lighten up the day we also sponsored the “Time 2 Shine” Talent Search began. Contestants danced, sang, read poetry, rapped and even acted out scenes for the possibility of acquiring a major recording contract or a chance to receive a walk-on role in a video or film.

As a result of their fine work the Youth Council continues to receive numerous honors for its work including proclamations and awards from: U.S. Congressional Representatives Tom DeLay (Majority Leader TX), Gregory Meeks (NY) and Henry Howard (GA); Senator Sam Brownback (KS); NYS Senate Majority Leader Malcolm A. Smith; NYC Council member Leroy Comrie; the NYS Assembly; NY City Council; Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin; and Dekalb County, GA CEO Vernon Jones. We’ve also received proclamations from the Mayor of Hartford, CT and in Philadelphia, PA and HHSYC was granted the Liberty Bell by Philly Mayor John Street. The organization has received local, national and international news coverage for their work from numerous broadcast, print, and online news outlets including: The Associated Press, Fox News Channel, BBC Global News Radio, the Canadian Broadcast Network ("CBC"), NY1 News, WCBS News Channel 2, WNBC News Channel 4, Fox 5 News, WABC News Channel 7, UPN-9 News, WB-11 News, BET News, MTV & MTV2, VH-1, The Christian Science Monitor, Billboard Magazine, Vibe Magazine, XXL Magazine, Source Magazine, F.E.D.S. Magazine, HITS, New York Newsday, NY Daily News, New York Post, New York Amsterdam News, the New Voice of NY, Caribbean Life, the LA Times, 4 Korners, Y2G.com, MTV.com, AllHipHop.com, SOHH.com, CNN.com, RollingStone.com, radio stations 1010 WINS, WWRL, WCBS NEWSRADIO 88, HOT-97 FM RADIO, Jamaica Times, Southeast Queens Press, Queens Chronicle, Queens Courier, Chelsea Now and others.

“Launching a Movement for Unity & Improvement”


About and Mission

The Hip-Hop Summit Youth Council (“HHSYC”) was founded by its Chairman Charles Fisher in July of 2001. The organization was created to help implement the commitments, guidelines and policies made by record companies, artists, community leaders and elected officials at the June 12-13, 2001 Hip-Hop Summit at the Hilton Hotel in New York. After attending the historic and successful "closed door" event and sitting on its Youth panel, Charles felt a genuine need to establish an Advocacy group that would work towards meeting Hip-Hop's most important challenges, which are to improve the image and unity within the Hip-Hop culture; show our participants how to constructively use their time, talent and the Hip-Hop culture to improve social, political and economic conditions in their school, home and community.

Randy Fisher has served as the executive director since 2002 and has provided a ‘hands on’ approach to the needs and aspirations of youths and young adults. As a 28-year-old seasoned executive he plays a duel role towards fulfilling the organization’s mission. He has to work in the trenches to earn the respect of young people, but also meet with elected officials, corporate, community, clergy, school staff and community leaders to address their many needs. Over the years he has earned the loyalty of our youths and young adults by communicating with them on a level they can understand and being there for them when the going gets tough. As their trusted representative he has the experience and professional skills to bridge the communication gap between our youth and adults so both can work to improve communities nationwide.

The multi-billion dollar Hip-Hop industry is the greatest international cultural phenomenon ever created. It transcends all racial, ethnic, religious and cultural backgrounds and is the way of life for our youth and young adults. With all the negativity surrounding Hip-Hop many are unaware that Love; Respect; Peace and Unity are the forgotten characteristics that gave birth to its four basic pillars which include: DJ’ing; MC’ing; Breakdancing; and Graffiti. Collectively, they are the Body & Soul of the culture. We have established Chapters in schools and communities across the country through the Council of the Great City Schools, which represents 66 cities and districts and 7.5 million public school students nationwide, as well as a host of other private and government agencies. This strategic alliance coupled with the clout of the Hip-Hop industry gives us the foundation to truly make a difference.

America is the greatest country on earth, but is built on a culture that glorifies sex, drugs, guns and violence. Each has contributed to the decay of our youth and young adults. With Hip-Hop now being taught in schools and universities throughout the country we will use it as an educational tool to teach participants about Drugs, Guns, Gang Violence, HIV/AIDS, Character Education, Politics, Economics and a host of other issues.

Celebrities, Professional Athletes, Politicians, Executives, Clergy, Law Enforcement Officers, Community Leaders and Ex-offenders will work together to reinforce the goals of each project and provide prizes and incentives to participants. Our goal is to “Flip the Script” and start a new trend that uses Hip-Hop to encourage our participants to graduate from school; improve their character; obtain meaningful employment; pursue their Entrepreneurial goals; fulfill their civic duty; and avoid the criminal justice system. As the "Raptivism Movement" grows stronger we will continue to use Hop-Hop as a vehicle to build a movement that works for the safety and positive development of young people



HHSYC - Mission Statement

The Mission of the Hip-Hop Summit Youth Council (“HHSYC”) is to work as an advocacy group to protect the rights, interest and future of our youths and young adults while addressing a host of issues that confront them daily. By partnering with schools, the entertainment industry, private and government agencies we have created a unique network that provides the resources to help young people fulfill their social and academic goals. Through the use of Hip-Hop we have bridged the communication gap between our youths and adults and have earned the trust and respect of both.

As the Multi-Billion dollar Hip-Hop Culture grows stronger, so does the "Raptivism Movement." It represents the New Social Message behind the Hip-Hop culture. As we grow as a company Parents, Artists, Executives, Politicians, Clergy, Businessmen and Community Leaders continue to support our work to use Hip-Hop as a tool for enlightenment and social change. Throughout the years we have created many programs that prepare our participants for the obstacles they will face and the leadership roles they will soon encounter. .

To improve the quality of life in our schools and communities we must create an environment that fosters respect, trust and cooperation. As parents we must take responsibility for the failures and anti-social behavior of our youths and young adults because "It Takes an Entire Village to Raise a Child." Through our program we will visit schools, youth centers, prisons and housing projects delivering a positive message while offering prizes, awards, grants, scholarships and other incentives that will improve the safety, academic and social development of our youths and young adults. .

OUR PURPOSE IS TO:

  • Improve the image and unity within the Hip-Hop community, as well as the grades, character and leadership skills of our members.

  • Work as an advocacy group with artists, actors, authors, professional athletes, elected officials, clergy and community leaders to address social, political, educational and economic issues that confront our youth each day.

  • Monitor the airplay of adult-rated music that is marketed to minors and contain offensive lyrics, negative images, substance abuse, violence and the degrading of women.

  • Mediate disputes within the Hip-Hop industry at schools and in the community before they escalate to crime and violence.

  • Coordinate workshops with artists to educate them on their social responsibilities to their company, family and community.

  • Coordinate workshops to educate the media, community residents, elected officials, clergy, teachers, and businesses on the history of the Hip-Hop culture.

  • Produce PSAs with artists that address the social concerns of our youth.

  • Provide scholarships, awards and other incentives to students, artists, celebrities, executives, elected officials, community leaders and individuals that are incarcerated.

  • Use Hip-Hop as a vehicle to establish an open line of communication which will help improve relations between parents, teachers, elected officials, the clergy, law enforcement agencies and our youth.

  • Establish ongoing dialogue between our youth in the U.S. and their peers abroad that will help reduce war, poverty and violence.

  • Establish Divisions or Branch Chapters that will help our members acquire the leadership skills, contacts and resources needed to improve the quality of their life as well as conditions in their school and community.

  • To register 10 million new voters by the end of 2008.

  • To promote the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World.

  • Support our Troops who are at war and/or enrolled in the military.

Team FLEET

Team FLEET is the group of indivudual who helped us make this website! to apply for our team FLEET program please e-mail info@hhsyc.org


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